Will your franchise win in the NEV wars? Part 6: Ford

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series New Energy Vehicles

Whatever your business in the automotive supply chain – whether you’re a supplier, OEM or distributor – all motor industry businesses face some momentous business decisions linked to the transition to new energy vehicles (NEV’s). While manufacturers consider the existential threats arising from transition timing, investment, regulatory and technology issues, dealers too have threats to consider. NEV’s generate a much reduced after-market value chain, for example which will lower earnings for everyone. Both OEMs and dealers face the question of how NEV’s will be distributed – direct or via a dealer network. Tesla are pioneering direct distribution and, it would be surprising if every vehicle maker wasn’t assessing the same option. The twin threats of direct distribution and ever-reducing after market earnings are stark for dealers around the globe. This series of posts looks at the profitability of seven global car makers under three scenarios: slow, moderate and fast transition to EV’s. In each scenario five changes are made to forecast the impact on OEM volumes and profitability over the next thirty years. Read on through this series of posts if you’d like to know which OEMs are at the most risk and where their pressure points are.

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Will sub-prime car loans spark the next financial crisis?

Banks and newspapers have been reporting recently that the boom in new car sales since 2013 in Europe and the US is based on giving car loans, PCP’s and leasing contracts to ever riskier borrowers. But some pundits go further, suggesting that the bonds sold to investors based on car loans – so, called ‘ auto -asset backed securities’ (Auto ABS) – could face dramatic falls in value as a result of this risky lending. In that scenario, not only would new car sales feel the pinch, because auto finance companies would not be able to re-cycle their funds into more loans so readily but – as far as the most alarmist are concerned – possibly the entire global economy could face a new financial shock. They say that the trend in financing new cars with PCP’s and 5-year plus loan durations mirrors the mis-selling of ‘sub-prime’ mortgages back in the first decade of the new millennium. This post looks at the way Auto ABS is created and managed in the post -global crisis period and concludes that, while dealers should expect the boom in new cars sales to slow in the US and the UK, there are now enough safeguards built into the financial system to avoid a calamity. Some bonds may fall in value. So too may residual values, particularly for diesel engine cars. However, the conclusion is that the scale of the sub-prime Auto ABS market is not large enough to spark a regional downturn, let alone a global one.

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